Tagged as Virtual Event

Mon, 10/26.
12:00pm

Doors Open Baltimore: Hidden Gems: Baltimore’s Churches: Virtual Lecture by Meg Fielding

Virtual

Hosted by Baltimore Architecture Foundation

Cost: Free

Meg Fielding has loved old churches all her life. From her childhood, being dragged from church to church with her parents, to the present day, working on a project of documenting historic brick churches along the Chesapeake Bay she still love old churches. While there are major churches that everyone knows in Baltimore like the Basilica or Old St. Paul’s, there are many hundreds more that are not noticed. She has scoured the city, hunting up these old churches to share them with you. Most are within the Baltimore City limits, but a few are just outside of the city.

Tue, 10/27 — 10/30.
9:00am

PastForward: Virtual Conference of the National Trust for Historic Preservation

Virtual

Hosted by National Trust for Historic Preservation

Celebrate the power of place, virtually, at PastForward Online 2020. Join more than a thousand preservationists and preservation lovers at the nation’s premier online conference for those who work to save, sustain, and interpret historic places.

Tue, 10/27.
12:00pm

Doors Open Baltimore: Designing for Social Equity: The Baer School

Virtual

Hosted by Baltimore Architecture Foundation

Cost: Free

Design | Dream | Activate will present about their design of the Baer City, a sensory driven, educational space for students with physical and cognitive disabilities. This inspirational, community driven project received the 2019 AIA Baltimore/Neighborhood Design Center Social Equity Award and a 2019 AIA Baltimore Excellence in Design Award Honorable Mention.

Tue, 10/27.
6:00pm

Doors Open Baltimore: Decoding Baltimore’s Modernist Religious Buildings

Virtual

Hosted by Baltimore Architecture Foundation

Cost: Free

Among the innovations of American sacred architecture after World War II was an interrogation of the decorative arts’ role both in religious life and in architecture itself. One common approach used by architects around the country can be defined as “Opticalism,” a neologism that denotes the deployment of aggressive and large-scale visual effects within spaces of worship. Opticalism represented a semiotic innovation, having to do with attenuating the relationship between sign and symbol.

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